Book Review: “Fae: The Wild Hunt” by Graham Austin-King

Fae: The Wild HuntA few weeks ago I received an email from Graham Austin-King asking if I might be interested in a copy of Fae: The Wild Hunt to read and review. After reading the book description I decided it was a pretty good fit for my personal reading taste and it has been a while since I read something involving the idea of the fae, so off I went.

Fae: The Wild Hunt is told from the viewpoint of two characters, Devin and Klöss. They both begin as young boys and over the course of the book progress through the years until they are a bit older. Devin and his mother flee from an abusive father and find themselves lost in the woods. There, Devin’s mother is trapped by a Fae creature in the middle of a fever dream and Devin is left to be found by a kind couple in a nearby town. This couple adopts him and raises him as their own. Klöss is a young boy who wants to be an oarsman on a reaving boat as his people plunder lands for goods and materials. His culture is one very similar to that of the vikings, perhaps they are even identical to vikings, but they are never referred to as such. Klöss grows up to be a commander of troops and helps to lead an invasion into the lands Devin calls home. By the end of the book the two of them have not quite crossed paths, but they are close.

There is a great deal of world building that takes place in Fae: The Wild Hunt, and I was impressed by all of it. It’s clear that there are pieces to the world that I haven’t even been exposed to yet, despite having finished the first book in the trilogy. For example, it isn’t until almost the very end that the Fae make their first significant appearance, and on top of that, suddenly there is a druid involved! I like surprises and I like world building that takes its time and allows a chance for the reader to adjust as new layers are added on top of the one already established.

An important thing to keep in mind while reading Fae: The Wild Hunt is that the book is very much part of a tightly interconnected trilogy. It ends on a cliffhanger of sizable proportions, but thankfully not in the middle of a scene, like some books do. The cliffhanger is adequate enough that the reader feels like they have reached a logical stopping point, but also enough that it really compels you to want to read the next book and see where the story goes next.

The pacing is a bit slow for the first portion of the book, but be patient, it pays off in the end. My favorite character was Klöss, so the introduction to Devin, which comes first, felt a little slow for my taste. However, once I met Klöss I was fine. Switching back to Devin at that point did not feel bad and by around the 25% mark I was nicely into the flow of the story. I think that if Klöss had been the initial viewpoint it would have helped me personally engage with the book earlier, but others might feel that Devin makes for a better entry point. Six of one, half-dozen of the other I suppose.

Fae: The Wild Hunt is a great piece of fiction and I’m glad I had the chance to experience it for myself. The second book in the trilogy, Fae: The Realm of Twilight, was recently released this past December. I need to find time in my reading schedule to add it to the list because I think I would very much like to see what happens next for Devin and Klöss.

Amazon   |   Barnes & Noble   |   Goodreads

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